Dog with head out window

Going on a trip doesn't mean that you have to leave your pet behind.

Are you planning a trip, but can't decide whether to bring your pet? Going on a trip doesn't mean that you have to leave your dog behind. That's right! Bringing your dog on a trip is a great way for them to get exercise, experience new sights and smells, and spend quality time with you.

Although vacations are fun for both you and your pet, you should be aware of the responsibilities as well as precautions involved with bringing along your furry friend. In this section you will find information that will help you and your pet have a fun and safe trip.

  • Camping with Pets

    Camping with pets presents its own challenges. Skunks, raccoons, porcupines, snakes, and other wildlife can bite or otherwise injure your pet. Keep your pet within sight and on a leash. Be considerate of other campers. Be sure to ask your veterinarian about flea, tick and heartworm prevention.

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  • Planning and Preparation

    Planning and preparation are necessary when traveling with family pets. Consider whether your pet is comfortable when traveling. Some animals, like some people, function better in familiar surroundings. A car-sick animal can make a trip miserable for everyone. Some ill or physically impaired dogs and

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  • Travel by Airplane

    Air travel is of most concern to pet owners. You can minimize the chances of an unpleasant experience by following a few guidelines. Federal regulations require that pets be at least 8 weeks old and weaned at least 5 days before flying. Generally, a health certificate (which is not more than 10 days

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  • Travel by Car

    Pets should not be allowed to ride with their heads outside car windows. Particles of dirt can enter the eyes, ears, and nose, causing injury or infection. If your pet is not accustomed to car travel, take it for a few short rides before your trip. Cats should be confined to a cage or crate to allow

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  • Travel by Bus or Train

    Most states prohibit animals from riding on buses and similar regulations restrict travel on trains. Exceptions are made for guide and service dogs accompanying blind and disabled persons. Consult your local carriers in advance for information.

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  • "I love them! They took great care of my frenchie at affordable pricing! Was able to call in and two days later able to get an appointment and get his vaccines done! Usually you have to sacrifice quality with convenience. But animal care veterinary clinic was both! Absolutely will come here for all of my furbabies needs!"
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  • Fish

    If you’re thinking of getting a pet fish, you should know that your veterinarian has a lot of good advice about pet ownership. Fish can be very rewarding as pets, and you just may be surprised about how much fish actually interact with their owners. Here’s more valuable information about choosing ...

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  • Hypertension

    Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is fairly common in cats. Although it can occur on its own, it is usually a sign of other serious health problems. High blood pressure can also cause problems with other parts of the body, including the eyes, kidneys and heart. Cats are more likely to develop high ...

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  • Hyperthyroidism in Cats

    Hyperthyroidism is a condition that causes a cat’s thyroid gland to produce too much thyroid hormone. This disease most often shows up in middle-aged and older cats. The thyroid gland is located in the neck. Thyroid hormones affect most organs in the body, so hyperthyroidism can lead to other problems ...

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  • Kidney Issues

    The kidneys have two important roles in a cat’s body. First, they filter wastes and toxins from the blood, which then exit the body in the urine. The kidneys also help regulate the volume of fluids in the body and important hormones and other chemicals. Cats can develop several kinds of kidney issues, ...

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  • Liver

    The liver is a very important organ. It is involved in digestion and removing harmful toxins from the blood. Cats can develop several conditions that affect how well their liver works. Cholangiohepatitis One of the most common causes of liver disease in cats is cholangiohepatitis. In this condition, ...

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  • Nasal Problems

    Cats can suffer from several conditions of nose, sinuses and other parts of the upper respiratory tract. These include nasopharyngeal polyps—a type of non-cancerous growth—and inflammation of the membranes of the nasal passages and sinuses. Nasopharyngeal Polyps A nasopharyngeal polyp is a mass of ...

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  • Neurological Issues

    Did you know that your cat’s brain is the size of a golf ball? Despite its small size, a cat’s brain is complex and is an integral part of how a feline’s neurological system functions. If a cat has a defect or injury associated with the brain and the other organs, muscles, tissues and nerves that ...

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  • Nutrition and Weight Control

    Like humans, cats need a balanced diet and to maintain a healthy weight, for optimal physiological functioning. Feeding your cat too much can lead to obesity; feeding your cat too little can lead to malnourishment. Furthermore, a cat may have an aversion to a certain cat food or a condition causing loss ...

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  • Oral Health for Felines

    In addition to nutrition and weight management, oral care is another component that plays a part in a cat’s overall health. By lessening plaque buildup and stopping the plaque from forming dental tartar, you can prevent or control periodontal (gum) disease in your cat. Destruction of the teeth, tongue, ...

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  • Orthopedic

    Cats are curious beings, and that curiosity can lead to injuries that affect their ability to move effortlessly through their environment. Of course, injuries are not the only source that can cause musculoskeletal limitations; sometimes, congenital defects may be the cause of a musculoskeletal problem. Orthopedists ...

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